The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has revealed a series of security blunders including losing confidential enforcement documents and revealing the details of 2,000 City workers.

A freedom of information (FOI) request to the FCA has revealed a series of data security lapses, The Times reports.

One incident saw highly sensitive regulatory reports sent to the wrong firm by the FCA. The regulator said the firm that receive the report in error ‘advised that the email had not been read’ and had deleted the email.

The FCA said that in September 2015, the names of 2,000 people who had applied for controlled function status had some of their personal details accidentally published on the FCA register.

According to the paper the details were published while the individuals were still in the process of moving jobs. Among the details published was the name of the firm they were moving to.

The FCA also said in 2016 it sent personal details of a City worker to the wrong firm, including their national insurance number, name and date of birth.

The regulator also accidentally allowed some FCA staff to see details of their colleagues’ salaries.

Andrew Tyrie, chairman of the Treasury select committee, said: ‘Our financial services watchdog should be holding itself to the standards it expects from industry.”

Andrew Tyrie, chairman of the Treasury select committee, expressed concern at the nature of the mistakes, saying: ‘Our financial services watchdog should be holding itself to the standards it expects from industry. ‘He added: ‘Everyone makes mistakes, but…the FCA seems to be making more than its fair share.’

The FCA said it had received no warnings or fines from the data regulator, the Information Commissioner’s Office. An FCA spokesman said: ‘None of the breaches identified resulted in any detriment to either firms or individuals.’