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From Big Sam to Wheatley, 10 people who made an early exit

We looked at 10 people who left their job earlier than expected.

‘Big’ Sam Allardyce, manager, England football team

It was an unfortunate week for football manager ‘Big’ Sam Allardyce.

The former Bolton Wanderers, Sunderland, Newcastle United, Notts County, Blackpool, West Ham and Blackburn Rovers manager was forced to resign from his dream job as England manager after just 67 days.

His resignation followed a Telegraph investigation which secretly recorded Allardyce giving undercover reporters his uncensored views on the England squad, the state of English football and, most controversially, rules which ban third party ownership of football players.

While everyone will have their opinions on whether Big Sam was hard done by, in the end it’s just a sad fact that sometimes a new job just doesn’t work out.

We looked at nine people in the financial world who were in their jobs for just a little bit longer than Allardyce.

‘Big’ Sam Allardyce, manager, England football team

It was an unfortunate week for football manager ‘Big’ Sam Allardyce.

The former Bolton Wanderers, Sunderland, Newcastle United, Notts County, Blackpool, West Ham and Blackburn Rovers manager was forced to resign from his dream job as England manager after just 67 days.

His resignation followed a Telegraph investigation which secretly recorded Allardyce giving undercover reporters his uncensored views on the England squad, the state of English football and, most controversially, rules which ban third party ownership of football players.

While everyone will have their opinions on whether Big Sam was hard done by, in the end it’s just a sad fact that sometimes a new job just doesn’t work out.

We looked at nine people in the financial world who were in their jobs for just a little bit longer than Allardyce.

Mary-Anne McIntyre, chief distribution officer, Old Mutual Wealth

It was viewed as something of a coup when Mary-Anne McIntyre joined Old Mutual Wealth from network Openwork.

So it came as something of a surprise when, just three months after McIntyre joined Old Mutual, a press release announced that she would leave her role as chief distribution officer.

Old Mutual Wealth did not expand on the reasons for her departure, but revealed Intrinsic chief executive Richard Freeman would succeed her.

Russell Harrop, investment strategist, Woodford Investment Management

Russell Harrop described himself as ‘Neil Woodford’s right hand investment man’ as Woodford Investment Management was rolled out, and he was one of the first hires for the star manager.

However it was not too long before he left Woodford’s side departing the firm after only four months.

Woodford may have used Harrop’s ‘invaluable’ support but clearly he did not need his ‘right hand man’ forever. A spokesman for the company said Harrop had only ever been brought in on a four month contract anyway.

Harrop returned though: in July last year he moved onto a role at Vestra Wealth.

Ros Altmann, pensions minister, Tory government

Ros Altmann’s appointment as pensions minister came as a surprise to many in the industry, as well to herself as she revealed in her blog for New Model Adviser® earlier this month.

Although her stay in the role was relatively brief, it was a period of drama and high tension. Things came to a fiery climax in March when she described her former boss Iain Duncan Smith as ‘exceptionally difficult' to work for and accused him of wanting to damage the Conservative party, after he resigned following the Budget.

Altmann campaigned vociferously for the UK to stay in the EU, but like so many in government the vote to leave eventually proved to be her downfall as newly elected Theresa May announced Altmann’s departure as part of her cabinet re-shuffle following the Brexit vote.

Perhaps the next pensions minister may be one who toes the Party line a little more?

Stephen Crabb, work and pensions secretary, Tory government

Many were not sure who Stephen Crabb was when he was appointed to the role of secretary of state for work and pensions following Iain Duncan Smith’s shock resignation earlier this year, but they certainly did by the time he left.

He immediately made his mark by shooting down any suggestion of the government giving concessions to help the Women Against State Pension Inequality campaign.

Crabb, who supported the remain campaign, was not content with merely his promotion to work and pensions minister, he was looking for bigger things, and launched a shock bid to become prime minister after David Cameron resigned.

However his campaign was very short-lived and he dropped out of the race after the first round of voting left Theresa May with a massive lead.

Perhaps it was for the best that Crabb did not make it to the top in the end. The Times published details of a saucy Whatsapp conversation in which he told another woman (not his wife) he wanted to kiss her ‘everywhere’.

It seems like its back to the back-benches for Crabb.

Mike Porter, head of acquisitions, Bellpenny

Mike Porter left the door wide open for questions about the future of acquisitions at Bellpenny when he left his role at the head of the acquisitions team in July after only one month.

Porter took over from Dominic Rose who was previously marketing and acquisitions manager at the consolidator. Porter jumped ship and landed squarely with the snappily named Old Mutual Wealth Private Client Advisers firm to work on acquisitions there.

After Rose’s gardening leave, he popped up side by side with his old colleague Porter at OMWPCA in September.

Bellpenny chief executive Nigel Stockton said after a long period getting the Bellpenny house in order, he will now take the lead on all future purchases.

Jackie Hunt, UK chief executive, Prudential

It may seem a little harsh to put Prudential UK chief executive Jackie Hunt on this list.

After all, she was around for two years at the life company after leaving her previous role as chief financial officer at Standard Life.

However, it was unusual for such a senior director to leave after only two years, particularly given the changes to Pru’s business model following the introduction of pension freedoms.

Hunt returned almost immediately after her exit. She joined Allianz to lead its asset management arm last March.

Adrian Martin, chairman, RSM Tenon

Adrian Martin had only found himself in the position of non-executive chairman at accountants and advisory firm RSM Tenon for three months before he found himself looking for a new venture.

‘Having established a new management team, this is an opportune moment for a new chairman to take the company forward over the long term,' RSM told investors.

His departure came at the same time that Michael Findlay, a non-executive director, also stepped down from the board, possibly raising questions about the hiring process of RSM at the time.

As the Oscar Wilde quote roughly goes: ‘To lose one non-exec director may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.’

Martin Wheatley, chief executive, FCA

The problem with shooting first and asking questions later is that eventually someone is going to have a quicker draw than you.

Regulation’s answer to Clint Eastwood found this out the hard way when former chancellor George Osborne gave him his marching orders last year.

Wheatley was originally handed a five year contract in 2011, but was only really able to get going in 2013 when the Financial Conduct Authority was launched.

Reports at the time of his departure suggested Osborne pulled the trigger due to Wheatley’s perceived anti-bank bias, much of which stemmed from his infamous claim to shoot first and ask questions later.

Vikki Williams, chief operating officer, Hargreaves Lansdown

Vikki William’s stint as chief operating officer of Hargreaves Lansdown lasted only eight months.

Williams started in the role at the discount broker in June 2015 before going the same way her fellow board member Nick Marson went, to the exit.

Williams later moved to a new position at life company Aviva.

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