Jane Wheeler, Direction Financial Planning, Taunton, Somerset

Jane Wheeler describes her book, Sorted! DIY Financial Planning – how to get the life you want, as a ‘DIY tool kit for financial planning’.

She says the book will certainly not replace the financial adviser but will introduce many people to the idea of paying a fee to receive financial advice. ‘It’s not about selecting the right fund, it’s about understanding how to set goals,’ she says.

‘It’s taken from my own experiences so, in truth, there wasn’t any research involved in writing it.’

Wheeler, former president of the Institute of Financial Planning, wrote the book because she felt a lot of people were not able to manage their own money. The book takes the financial planner’s approach of goal setting and guides the reader through the process of deciding first what they want and then how they might achieve it.

‘It was first published in August 2008 and I update it after every Budget, though not the last one in March because that wasn’t a proper Budget.’

Jane Wheeler, Direction Financial Planning, Taunton, Somerset

Jane Wheeler describes her book, Sorted! DIY Financial Planning – how to get the life you want, as a ‘DIY tool kit for financial planning’.

She says the book will certainly not replace the financial adviser but will introduce many people to the idea of paying a fee to receive financial advice. ‘It’s not about selecting the right fund, it’s about understanding how to set goals,’ she says.

‘It’s taken from my own experiences so, in truth, there wasn’t any research involved in writing it.’

Wheeler, former president of the Institute of Financial Planning, wrote the book because she felt a lot of people were not able to manage their own money. The book takes the financial planner’s approach of goal setting and guides the reader through the process of deciding first what they want and then how they might achieve it.

‘It was first published in August 2008 and I update it after every Budget, though not the last one in March because that wasn’t a proper Budget.’

Keith Churchouse, Churchouse Financial Planning, Guildford, Surrey

Keith Churchouse has written two books, Sign Here, Here and Here, journey of a financial adviser and Addicted to Wedding Cake, the journey to divorce.

The first book, which he describes as ‘an amusing trawl through financial services since 1985’, is written for initiates to the finance industry and has been accepted by the Open University as a course text.

The second is also based on personal experience. ‘I have been divorced twice and after the first split, I didn’t know what was going on. So if you are going to get divorced, this is what you need to know, from separation to starting again. It has a foreword by two solicitors and includes relevant court documents.’

To squeeze writing into his busy life, Churchouse would start before the break of dawn. ‘I worked on the book from 4am to 7am, but that’s motivation for you.’

There’s no question of writer’s block for him: ‘There is a third book in the works that carries on the business planning theme. But that is in the stocks while I write another book, a love story, for the Guildford Book Festival short book prize.’

Tony Granger, Mentor Professional, Worcester

Tony Granger is the most prolific author in our top 10 with 12 books to his name, the most recent of which is on succession planning.

‘The book covers all aspects of succession planning for business owners, trusts and individuals, and is a practical guide to the whole area of succession planning, including a review of the legal and taxation implications, and the practical steps that must be taken to ensure a successful exit – whether from a business, a trust or through estate planning and wills,’ says Granger.

Granger came to the UK in 1987 from South Africa, where he had been a legal adviser in the financial services industry, and was struck by the lack of information available to advisers. ‘The only material was a few leaflets from life offices. There weren’t any books on protection, pensions and so on.’

Now his books can be found on the high street in WHSmith, Waterstones, and other leading book shops.

‘One of my main targets is the Financial Services Authority’s objective of educating people about financial planning. That’s where I fit in,’ he says.

‘I have had letters and testimonials from people who didn’t know what to do with their pension scheme but [who said] that they understand now, and I’m going to give the book to their adviser.’

Len Warwick, Warwick Butchart, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

Len Warwick’s writing ambitions are not limited to financial services text books. His ‘industry book’; written 10 years ago is called Making a Difference and is an autobiographical account of his time in financial services since 1961.

‘It’s 140 pages but it needs updating to account for the events of the last five years,’ says Warwick. ‘I had been writing in industry publications for 30 years and always thought I should write a book. Then my friends said I should as well so I did.’

His second book, completed 18 months ago, is a novel, The Unspoken. ‘It’s set in Ireland and includes a few historical signposts. It’s all about identity. Someone decides to trace their family tree and uncovers some secrets,’ he says.

The novel took three years to research and the industry book was based largely on ‘scribbled’ notes from over the years, he says.

‘I definitely have two novels in me and I would write them now if I didn’t have treating customers fairly and the retail distribution review to occupy my time.’

Ian Green, Primrose Associates, London

Ian Green moved from speaking to writing following an appearance at the Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT) event in the US.

‘MDRT’s organisers came up to me and asked where my exhibit was but I didn’t have anything to sell! So I decided I’d write a book. I wrote it in a weekend, 37 hours flat out; sat down, wrote, finished it.’

Being a young adviser, Green was somewhat of a novelty and had been invited to speak at several financial services events, including the PFS. As the book, The Financial Adviser: how to be a successful practitioner, drew on what he had heard on the circuit, Green decided not to keep the profits.

‘Some went to a charity set up by Chris Perrott, who had to have dialysis and was an IFA. The book sold for £15 so £5 per book went to the charity.’

The book had a 2,000 print run in the UK. Then Green sold the translation rights to a Korean publisher for £1,000.

‘It was republished in Korea, where it has been massive. It is now in its third edition in the Korean language. They particularly like the timing system which, I hear, is now widely used by advisers in Korea.

‘When I first wrote it, I used a [promotional] quote from a financial adviser who said: “Young, easy to read, the financial services’ Jamie Oliver, Pukka!”

Keith Robertson, Armstrong Financial, Wigan, Lancashire

Keith Robertson has more than one iron in the fire as an author, with a book and an industry paper in the works.

‘I am writing a book, but it’s a work in progress. Assuming I find a publisher, it will be out next year. I am also writing a paper, An Appraisal of Investment Risk in the Retail Market, for the industry on investment risk, which is being round tabled at the moment and which is the priority.’

The paper, due out this autumn, ‘is not so much a research paper as a polemic’, he says. ‘It’s a look at the way the industry, regulators and advisers look at investment risk, which is terrible.’

The book, as yet untitled, is a review of approaches that have not worked in the investment space and what would have a more ‘rational’ chance of working.

‘I intend it for a general audience in the first instance, with a follow up for the advice sector,’ says Robertson. ‘There are chunks that are written already that need pulling together but I need to find an editor to cut it down. I am well aware of my own faults and I tend to tinker and rewrite parts constantly.’

Roger Taylor, Altorfer Financial Management, Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire

Roger D Taylor has written two books on sailing: Voyages of a Simple Sailor and the follow-up Mingming and the Art of Minimal Ocean Sailing: More Voyages of a Simple Sailor, which has not yet been released. Both are accounts of his seafaring adventures.

The first charts his time aboard the Endeavour II, a replica of Captain Cook’s ship Endeavour, as it followed the explorer’s voyages. While avoiding Cook’s fate – he was killed by Hawaiian tribesmen – Taylor’s time aboard the vessel ended with a shipwreck, which he describes in vivid detail.

Unfortunately Taylor was unable to speak to New Model Adviser® about his book because he is sailing in the Arctic. According to his office: ‘Roger is a pretty cool guy.’

Derek Stewart, Strategic Asset Management, near Glasgow

Derek Stewart is writing a book ‘based on the concept of fear’ and aimed at management teams which, he claims, risk overwhelming staff with a heavy-handed results culture.

‘I have a background in martial arts and I know when you are standing toe to toe, fear paralyses you,’ he says.

‘When mistakes are made, people tend to beat up those below them. There is a blame culture. My book looks at how to get rid of this culture while still dealing with mistakes.’

Stewart, who plans to self publish, is struggling to fit writing into a hectic schedule that includes training for a 138-mile Ironman triathlon.

‘I have little time to write at the moment so I don’t see the book out before January next year. I have a production team who are pushing me for copy,’ he says.

Martin Bamford, Informed Choice, Chelmsford, Gloucestershire

Martin Bamford has written three books, The Money Tree, published in 2008, Brilliant Investing, 2007, and How to Retire 10 Years Early, 2008.

‘The first and second were WH Smith’s business book of the month,’ said Bamford. ‘But there’s not a huge amount of money to be made from selling books. The main benefit is the enquiries it has generated. Even now, four years after the first book was published, people call me because they have read the book or someone has told them about it.’

Bamford estimates he has made ‘tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of pounds’ of business from the books. That’s not bad for three months’ work per book.

‘It was a combination of a few hours every weekend and some late nights after I had left work and fulfilled my family obligations. I’m not a morning person,’ he says.

The first two books were written as part of a two-book deal with the publisher, which then suggested the title of the third.

‘I might write another on business development. I love writing and at some point would like to write a novel.’

Stewart Fowler, No Monkey Business, London

As well as being the basis of Stewart Fowler’s advice company, No Monkey Business is the product of the dot com bubble.

‘After working as an investment consultant for a financial services company, I joined a colleague in a plan to establish a way of using online financial modelling to deliver an investment advice service modelled on what I had seen in the US,’ he says.

By the time he had competed the financial modelling for his new business, the bubble had burst. ‘My partner turned his back on the project, but I could not walk away from two years’ work so I decided to use it in the book.’

The book took six months to write and is an examination of problems in UK financial services and how to solve them. ‘It’s really two books: one is about the historical development of financial services and the second about where we go next. The publisher wanted two different books but I didn’t want to take on the extra work so I found a less demanding publisher.’